Skip to main content

DNA Science: Forensics, Food, and Medicine

Using the Library Discovery Tool to Find Books

The Library Discovery Tool can help you find books, and journal, magazine and newspaper articles available through Brown University Library. 

Watch the brief video below for more information on using the Library Discovery Tool to find ebooks.

Periodicals

Periodicals are publications issued at regular intervals (weekly, monthly, quarterly) without any intended final issue.  Examples include magazines and scholarly journals.

What is a 'scholarly' source?  Scholarly sources are written by researchers and experts ('scholars') for other researchers and experts.  Scholarly sources use formal language that assumes knowledge of the subject, and always include a bibliography or list of references.  The purpose of a scholarly source is to disseminate or findings from original research.  Journals are an example of a scholarly source.

What is a 'popular' source?  Popular sources are written by staff writers, and occasionally researchers and experts, for the general public.  Popular sources use language that assumes little knowledge of the subject, and rarely include a bibliography or list of references.  The purpose of a popular source is to inform and entertain.  Magazines are an example of a popular source.

Listed below are two periodicals, available electronically through Brown University Library, that may be useful for the assignment for Module 1.

Note on Access to Licensed Electronic Resources: License agreements for most of the Library's electronic resources permit access only to currently-enrolled Brown University students, staff, and faculty.  The licensed icon Licensed Icon next to a resource indicates that, if you have not already authenticated (e.g. through Canvas), you will be prompted to log in with your Brown username and password before gaining access to these licensed resources.

Websites

Websites can be valuable sources of information, but like any resource, it is important to evaluate a website prior to using information from it.  When evaluating a resource, consider its currency, authority (authorship), accuracy, and purpose or bias.

Here is one reliable website that may be useful for the assignment for Module 1.