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Public Digital Projects for Courses

This guide will help students and faculty create public digital projects, as part of a class, as a research project, or as a way of presenting their research or community-engaged scholarship.

Introduction

Creating public digital projects can be a useful aspect of pedagogy, encouraging the exploration of sources, the organization  of narratives, and the consideration of audiences. Digital projects—exhibits, presentations, compilations, and more—lend themselves to  collaborative work, and they are especially appropriate in classes taught all or in part online.

 

This guide will help students and faculty create public digital projects, as part of a class, as a research project, or as a way of presenting their research or community-engaged scholarship.  For undergraduates, developing a digital project may be a class assignment (e.g., for a final project), the central activity for all students in a course, or may serve as a capstone project for a concentration. Graduate students may develop digital projects as a program requirement or part of their scholarly portfolios.  Faculty, individually or with student assistance, may also seek to develop digital projects as a form of scholarly or public-facing publication of their research.

 

This document begins with pedagogical questions: what is the purpose of your digital project? Who is the audience? What kinds of materials do you have available? Is it the final product of existing research, or is it created as an ongoing part of a research project? It continues with process: what to do, when. 

 

The final part of the document is concerned with choosing the right platform. There are many platforms to choose from in creating public digital projects, some through Brown, some commercial, some offered by nonprofits. Some are supported by Brown, others are not. Choose a platform based on the type of material you’re displaying, the story you’re telling, the kind of presentation you desire, and the audience you’re targeting. Different platforms are supported in different ways. This document describes some of the platforms, with examples of the kinds of digital projects that they can be used to create. 


Finally, this document offers links to Brown resources for creating these and provides information on the ways that the Center for Digital Scholarship supports this kind of work through workshops and consultations.