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Gender and Sexuality Studies

Interlibrary Loan for Print Books Is Back!

As of November 1, 2020, you are once again able to request print books through Interlibrary Loan. Please request your books through Borrow Direct. The 72 hour quarantine will remain in effect once the books arrive at our library. Note: Ebooks may not be requested from Interlibrary Loan.

Articles and book chapters may continue to be requested using either the Findit! button or your ILLiad account.

For more information, see our Library News blog on the library home page.

Research Help During the Pandemic

Our libraries are slowly opening up, but it will be a whiIe yet before things are back to the way they used to be.

For up to date info on studying in the library or obtaining materials, please see our blog.

Just remember: I am still available to help you with your research needs and library questions, big or small. Please see my contact information and hours of availability in the box on this page. I can help you via email, or you are welcome to use my calendar to set up a Zoom or Chat meeting.

Welcome...

Welcome to the subject guide for Gender and Sexuality Studies. Here you will find resources that can help you with your research in these areas. Please feel free to contact me for a one-on-one appointment to discuss your research. My appointment calendar can be found in the Your Librarian box on this page.

If you're new to writing college level research papers, you might like to take a look at our guide below.

The guide has been newly updated to address some issues regarding accessing library resources from off-campus during the COVID-19 situation. Many of your questions will be answered here.

 

J. M. Brunswick & Blake Co. Advertisement. 1880s. Luna Insight Collection.

Research evaluation

It can be hard sometimes to know whether a source is trustworthy or not. One quick method is the following:

Try asking yourself the following questions:

  1. Currency: How up to date is the information in this site?
  2. Relevance: How relevant is the information for your needs? Is it an appropriate level (not too elementary or too advanced)?
  3. Authority: Who is responsible for the information in this source? What are their credentials?
  4. Accuracy: Does the source provide evidence to support the information? Can it be found elsewhere?
  5. Purpose: What is the purpose? Is it to teach, sell, persuade?

Of course, Karen can also help you determine the validity of any resource you might be unsure about.

The above test was developed by librarian Sarah Blakeslee and her team at California State University, Chico.

New Titles

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Acquisitions in the Brown Library